MFL

OVERVIEW

Welcome to the world of opportunities; A Vista to the world: Modern Languages

We aim to make all students to know another language and to do this we provide a curriculum which is informative, challenging, progressive, and relevant. We aim to deliver high-quality language teaching, equipping our students with the knowledge of another culture and civilisation. The curriculum is developed as such in which pupils are taught the language (Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking) and how to apply it in their daily life.

Delivery of Modern Languages National Curriculum

The schemes of work is mapped out across both Key stages (KS3 and KS4) so that our pupils have an excellent opportunity of meeting the requirements of National Curriculum from year 7 and learning and building on those languages skills which are vital for their future professions. Most of our students will sit their exams at the of year 11.

Click here for the specification 

Subject content 

The Pearson Edexcel Level 1/Level 2 GCSE (9–1) in Arabic/Urdu allows students to develop their ability to communicate with Arabic/Urdu native speakers in both speech and writing. Students will study across a variety of contexts relevant to their age and interests and will also develop a greater awareness of the culture of Arabic/Urdu-speaking communities and countries. These contexts are listed under Themes and topics.

Students will need to develop and use their knowledge and understanding of grammar progressively through their course of study. To help students build on their range of vocabulary, a list is provided of words that students are expected to use and understand. These lists are not exhaustive but are intended as a guide; students at both tiers will be required to understand and respond to familiar words (appropriate to the tier) that are not on the lists.

Qualification aims and objectives

The aims and objectives of this qualification are to enable students to:

  • develop their ability to communicate confidently and coherently with native speakers in speech and writing, conveying what they want to say with increasing accuracy
  • express and develop thoughts and ideas spontaneously and fluently
  • listen to and understand clearly articulated, standard speech at near normal speed
  • deepen their knowledge about how language works and enrich their vocabulary in order for them to increase their independent use and understanding of extended language in a wide range of contexts
  • acquire new knowledge, skills and ways of thinking through the ability to understand and respond to a rich range of authentic spoken and written material, adapted and abridged, as appropriate, including literary texts
  • develop awareness and understanding of the culture and identity of the countries and communities where the language is spoken
  • be encouraged to make appropriate links to other areas of the curriculum to enable bilingual and deeper learning, where the language may become a medium for constructing and applying knowledge
  • develop language-learning skills both for immediate use and to prepare them for further language study and use in school, higher education or employment
  • develop language strategies, including repair strategies.

MFL at KS4

Themes and topics

Questions across all four language skills are set in common contexts, addressing a range of relevant contemporary and cultural themes. They are organised into five themes, each broken down into topics and sub-topics.

The five themes are:

  1. Identity and culture
  2. Local area, holiday, travel
  3. School
  4. Future aspirations, study and work
  5. International and global dimension.

All themes and topics must be studied in the context of both the students’ home country and that of countries and communities where Arabic/Urdu is spoken.

 

For listening and reading assessments, the majority of contexts are based on the culture and countries where the assessed language is spoken. Students may also refer to the culture of the assessed language country/countries or communities in the speaking and writing papers.

It is, therefore, important that students are exposed to materials relating to Arabic/Urdu-speaking countries throughout the course.

Each topic has been highlighted in bold.

 

All topics must be studied in the context of both the students’ home country and that of countries and communities where Arabic/Urdu is spoken.

Theme 1: Identity and culture

  • Who am I?: relationships; when I was younger; what my friends and family are like; what makes a good friend; interests; socialising with friends and family; role models
  • Daily life: customs and everyday life; food and drink; shopping; social media and technology (use of, advantages and disadvantages)
  • Cultural life: celebrations and festivals; reading; music; sport; film and television

Theme 2: Local area, holiday and travel

  • Holidays: preferences; experiences; destinations
  • Travel and tourist transactions: travel and accommodation; asking for help and dealing with problems; directions; eating out; shopping
  • Town, region and country: weather; places to see; things to do

Theme 3: School

  • What school is like: school types; school day; subjects; rules and pressures; celebrating success
  • School activities: school trips; events and exchanges

Theme 4: Future aspirations, study and work

  • Using languages beyond the classroom: forming relationships; travel; employment
  • Ambitions: further study; volunteering; training
  • Work: jobs; careers and professions

Theme 5: International and global dimension

  • Bringing the world together: sports events; music events; campaigns and good causes
  • Environmental issues: being ‘green’; access to natural resources

ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW

Assessment Unit 1 Listening 25%
Assessment Unit 2 Speaking 25%
Assessment Unit 3 Reading 25%
Assessment Unit 4 Writing 25%
All units will be exam based and they externally examined and marked.

Paper 1: Listening and understanding

Content

Students are assessed on their understanding of standard spoken Arabic/Urdu in a variety of scenarios.

Students will need to:

  • identify the overall message, key points, details and opinions
  • deduce meaning from a variety of spoken texts
  • recognise the relationship between past, present and future events
  • recognise and respond to key information, important themes and ideas in spoken text, including authentic sources, adapted and abridged, as appropriate
  • be able to answer questions, extract information, evaluate and draw conclusions.

This paper draws on vocabulary and structures across all the themes

(see Themes and topics).

Students are presented with recorded scenarios involving one or more speakers in public and social settings. Recordings include authentic sources and are based on the themes. Recorded material features both male and female voices and represents different age groups.

Students should be given the opportunity to become accustomed to hearing the Arabic/Urdu language spoken in a range of styles and registers. Recordings for individual questions within the assessment vary in length, including both short and longer spoken passages, using both familiar language and, where appropriate, morE complex language and abstract material, as appropriate to the tier.

To prepare students adequately for this assessment, teachers should present and exploit a range of vocabulary relevant to each theme listed and build on the Key Stage 3 Programme of Study, where appropriate.

 

Paper 2: Speaking

Content

Students are assessed on their ability to communicate and interact effectively through

speaking in Arabic/Urdu for different purposes.

Students will need to:

  • convey information and narrate events coherently and confidently, using and adapting language for different purposes
  • speak spontaneously, responding to unpredictable questions, points of view or situations, sustaining communication by using rephrasing or repair strategies, as appropriate
  • use a range of vocabulary and grammatical structures accurately, including some more complex forms, with reference to past, present and future events
  • make creative and more complex use of the language, as appropriate, to express and justify their own thoughts and points of view
  • use accurate pronunciation and intonation in order to be understood by a native speaker, however they will be able to access the highest marks available for each task without a ‘perfect’ command of Arabic/Urdu.

 

These are assessed through a series of three consecutive tasks.

Task 1 – Role play

The role play is an interaction requiring the student to ask and answer questions, to exchange information and to use different registers (see definition of registers beneath the Role play mark grid within the marking guidance section of the specification). The role play relates to either formal or informal scenarios, in turn inviting the student to use either formal or informal language relevant to the scenario. Each role play stimulus card includes an instruction to the student on whether to use language appropriate for a formal or informal conversation.

All role plays are marked for communication only. The role plays are set and provided by Pearson at the time of assessment together with a sequencing grid and instructions. For an example, please see the Pearson Edexcel Level 1/Level 2 GCSE (9–1) in Arabic/Urdu Sample Assessment Materials (SAMs) document – Paper 2: Speaking in Arabic/Urdu, General instructions to the teacher section.

Scenarios require an exchange of information. Some scenarios are transactional in nature. The scenarios are based on any of the topics from themes 1 to 4 (listed on page 9), i.e. not on the theme International and global dimension as this theme lends itself better to the picture-based task and the conversation.

 

Task 2 – Picture-based task

The assessment scenario is based on any of the topics (listed on page 9). The topic is allocated by Pearson at the time of assessment together with a sequencing grid and instructions. For an example, please see the Pearson Edexcel Level 1/Level 2 GCSE (9–1) in Arabic/Urdu Sample Assessment Materials (SAMs) document – Paper 2: Speaking in

Arabic/Urdu, General instructions to the teacher section. This assessment allows students to:

  • describe and narrate events
  • give information
  • express, justify and exchange opinions.

Students are required to refer to past, present and future events in this assessment at both Foundation and Higher tiers, using different timeframes.

Pearson Edexcel Level 1/Level 2 GCSE (9-1) in Arabic/Urdu– Specification – Issue 1 – March 2017 © Pearson Education Limited 2017

 

Task 3 – Conversation

The conversation allows students to cover all of the requirements outlined in the Content section on page 12, including conveying information, giving points of view, developing and initiating conversation and discussion and producing extended sequences of speech.

The conversation is based on any two themes (see Themes and topics) and is in two parts. For the first part of the conversation, the student selects one topic from one theme in advance of the assessment. The choice of topic must be agreed between the student and the teacher and must be selected no later than two weeks before the assessment takes place. This part of the conversation task starts with this first topic and then may move on to other topics within the same theme.

The second part of the conversation must be on a different theme. This will be prescribed by Pearson through instructions on a sequencing grid. For an example please see the Pearson Edexcel Level 1/Level 2 GCSE (9–1) in Arabic/Urdu Sample Assessment Materials (SAMs) document – Paper 2: Speaking in Arabic/Urdu, General instructions to the teacher section.

This part of the conversation may focus on one or more topics from within the selected theme (see page 9). Students are required to refer to past, present and future events in this assessment, using a range of tenses and timeframes.

Paper 3: Reading and understanding

Content

Students are assessed on their understanding of written Arabic/Urdu across a range of different types of texts. Students need to:

  • identify the overall message, key points, details and opinions in texts
  • deduce meaning from a variety of written texts
  • recognise the relationship between past, present and future events
  • understand texts, organise and present relevant details, and, where appropriate, draw inferences in context and recognise implicit meaning
  • recognise and respond to key information, important themes and ideas in more extended written text, including authentic sources, adapted and abridged as appropriate, by being able to extract information and answer questions.

This paper draws on vocabulary and structures across all the themes (see Themes and

topics)Texts for individual questions within the assessment use high-frequency language and vary in length, including both short- and longer written passages. Texts include authentic sources that introduce more complex language and unfamiliar materials.

The range of text types include:

  • advertisements, emails, letters, articles and literary texts
  • a short passage to be translated from Arabic/Urdu into English.

Literary texts consist of short extracts from texts that may have been adapted and abridged from authentic sources to be appropriate to this level – from letters, short stories, novels or plays to contemporary and historical sources. Students are also expected to translate a short passage of written Arabic/Urdu into English to demonstrate an ability to transfer meaning accurately into English. Scenarios in the texts are set either at home or, more frequently, in an Arabic/Urdu-speaking country, allowing students to develop appropriate cultural awareness and understanding.

To prepare students adequately for this assessment, teachers should present and exploit a range of vocabulary relevant to each theme listed, building on the Key Stage 3 Programme of Study, where appropriate. Students should be presented with Arabic/Urdu language in a range of styles or registers and in a variety of different contexts, as appropriate to their age and level of understanding. Students should also be presented with different fonts and formats, for example short, printed messages, articles and email messages.

Paper 4: Writing

Content

Students are assessed on their ability to communicate effectively through writing in Arabic/Urdu.

Students need to:

  • communicate effectively in writing for a variety of purposes across a range of specified contexts
  • write short texts, using simple sentences and familiar language accurately to convey meaning and exchange information
  • produce clear and coherent text of extended length to present facts and express ideas and opinions appropriately for different purposes and in different settings
  • make accurate use of a variety of vocabulary and grammatical structures, including some more complex forms, to describe and narrate with reference to past, present and future events
  • manipulate the language, using and adapting a variety of structures and vocabulary with increasing accuracy and fluency for new purposes, including using appropriate style and register
  • make independent, creative and more complex use of the language, as appropriate, to note down key points, express and justify individual thoughts and points of view, in order to interest, inform or convince
  • translate sentences and short texts from English into the assessed language to convey key messages accurately and to apply grammatical knowledge of language and structures in context.

  

How Parents can Support

Parents are encouraged to work and support their children at home. They should engage in discussions with their children and ensure that they complete their homework on time and regularly. Parents should ask their children ‘what did you learn today’ rather than ‘what did you do today?’ Every mother and father can help their children by asking name of things around them in Arabic/Urdu; things in the kitchen, in the garden, thing around the house, shopping centres and so on.

If you have any questions, please, contact me and I will be with you in no time, in sha Allah.

Brother Ozair Akhtar

Head of Modern Foreign Languages